Mitchell’s equation II

This work belongs to the Mitchell’s dream series, inspired by the Chemiosmotic hypothesis that penetrates all biology. The Nobel prize winning British biochemist Peter Mitchell first published his ideas on the proton motive force in Nature in 1961. The equations here suggest the mitochondrial network.


Mitchell’s equation I

This work belongs to the Mitchell’s dream series, inspired by the Chemiosmotic hypothesis that penetrates all biology. The Nobel prize winning British biochemist Peter Mitchell first published his ideas on the proton motive force in Nature in 1961. The equations here suggest the mitochondrial network.

Erich Gnaiger wrote a short paper inspired by these images. You can read it here.


Working out well

Working out well (silk, 80 x 80 cms). Transversally cut muscle tissue. With a structured fibrous organization and a few blood vessels visible, mitochondria are not visible here as structures, but no prize for guessing where the faulty mitochondria are located.


Networking energies

Networking energies (silk 95 x 95 cms). The level of energy of different cells varies. The mitochondria, responsible for the energy production have in this picture two different energy states, represented by gold and silver.


Mitochondria at work

Mitochondria at work (silk 90 x 90 cms). The mitochondrial network defines the outline of this cell. DNA is red, with a vibrant nucleus and little outposts of mitochondrial DNA in the network.


Mitochondrial Network by Odra Noel

From the defined shape of individual mitochondria, to the concept of large mitochondrial networks. In this case the mitochondrial network defines the shape of the cell. Everything else is missing, including cell membranes. The nucleus is a hole, represented by a glow of what has been but is no more.


Altmann’s Bioblasts – The Four Seasons (Autumn) by Odra Noel

The colours of autumn do not mix with mitochondria happily. This element of the four seasons takes its inspiration from early cellular stains, which give it an air of Halloween party. Also, the fact that the canvas is silk comes across more strongly in this season than in the other three. Ritual dancing more than harvesting, in spirit.


Altmann’s Bioblasts – The Four Seasons (Spring) by Odra Noel

From the four seasons series, spring. Altmann’s bioblast work well in cold colours, I have interpreted them in greens and blues far more than in reds and other warmer colours. I don’t know why. This version is particularly bright, and frequently is chosen as the best of the four when all are put together.


Altmann’s Bioblasts – The Four Seasons (Winter) by Odra noel

The four seasons is a series of four pieces (spring, summer, autumn and winter) in the tradition of classic works, with the colours of each piece being an interpretation of the seasons. I used my favourite theme of Altmann’s bioblast as the motive. And it does make sense to me, with mitochondria being adaptable organelles able to supply energy to all needs and states. Winter, though, is the one that presents a kind of contradiction: the cool colours contrast with the organic forms of the confluent cells, and the sinuous shapes of the bioblasts. The final effect is rather warm.


Mitonucleus by Odra Noel

Mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus; a trio of elements that I have represented many times, each a new view of a complex interactions. This one is a happy arrangement in a balanced equilibrium, living a quiet life.